Continuing Company Analysis–Amazon: Accounts receivable turnover and number of days’ sales in receivables Amazon.com, Inc. is one of the largest Internet retailers in the world. Best Buy, Inc. is a leading retailer of consumer electronics and media products in the United States. Amazon and Best Buy compete in similar markets; however, Best Buy sells through both traditional retail stores and the Internet, while Amazon sells only through the Internet. Sales and accounts receivable information for both companies for a recent period follows (in millions): Amazon Best Buy Sales $88,988 $40,339 Accounts receivable: Beginning of year 4,767 1,308 End of year 5,612 1,280 A. Determine the accounts receivable turnover for each company. (Round all calculations to one decimal place.) B. Determine the number of days’ sales in receivables for each company. (Round all calculations to one decimal place.) C. Evaluate the relative efficiency in collecting accounts receivables between the two companies. D. What might explain this difference?

BuyFind

Corporate Financial Accounting

14th Edition
Carl Warren + 2 others
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305653535
BuyFind

Corporate Financial Accounting

14th Edition
Carl Warren + 2 others
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305653535

Solutions

Chapter
Section
Chapter 8, Problem 8.1ADM
Textbook Problem

Continuing Company Analysis–Amazon: Accounts receivable turnover and number of days’ sales in receivables

Amazon.com, Inc. is one of the largest Internet retailers in the world. Best Buy, Inc. is a leading retailer of consumer electronics and media products in the United States. Amazon and Best Buy compete in similar markets; however, Best Buy sells through both traditional retail stores and the Internet, while Amazon sells only through the Internet. Sales and accounts receivable information for both companies for a recent period follows (in millions):

Amazon Best Buy
Sales $88,988 $40,339
Accounts receivable:
Beginning of year 4,767 1,308
End of year 5,612 1,280

A. Determine the accounts receivable turnover for each company. (Round all calculations to one decimal place.)

B. Determine the number of days’ sales in receivables for each company. (Round all calculations to one decimal place.)

C. Evaluate the relative efficiency in collecting accounts receivables between the two companies.

D. What might explain this difference?

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Chapter 8 Solutions

Corporate Financial Accounting
Ch. 8 - Direct write-off method Journalize the following...Ch. 8 - Allowance method Journalize the following...Ch. 8 - Percent of sales method At the end of the current...Ch. 8 - Analysis of receivables method At the end of the...Ch. 8 - Note receivable Prefix Supply Company received a...Ch. 8 - Classifications of receivables The Boeing Company...Ch. 8 - Nature of uncollectible accounts MGM Resorts...Ch. 8 - Entries for uncollectible accounts, using direct...Ch. 8 - Entries for uncollectible receivables, using...Ch. 8 - Entries to write off accounts receivable Creative...Ch. 8 - Providing for doubtful accounts At the end of the...Ch. 8 - Number of days past due Toot Auto Supply...Ch. 8 - Aging of receivables schedule The accounts...Ch. 8 - Estimating allowance for doubtful accounts Evers...Ch. 8 - Adjustment for uncollectible accounts Using data...Ch. 8 - Estimating doubtful accounts Outlaw Bike Co. is a...Ch. 8 - Entry for uncollectible accounts Using the data in...Ch. 8 - Entries for bad debt expense under the direct...Ch. 8 - Entries for bad debt expense under the direct...Ch. 8 - Effect of doubtful accounts on net income During...Ch. 8 - Effect of doubtful accounts on net income Using...Ch. 8 - Entries for bad debt expense under the direct...Ch. 8 - Entries for bad debt expense under the direct...Ch. 8 - Determine due date and interest on notes Determine...Ch. 8 - Entries for notes receivable Valley Designs Issued...Ch. 8 - Entries for notes receivable The series of five...Ch. 8 - Entries for notes receivable, including year-end...Ch. 8 - Entries for receipt and dishonor of note...Ch. 8 - Entries for receipt and dishonor of notes...Ch. 8 - Receivables on the balance sheet List any errors...Ch. 8 - Allowance method entries The following...Ch. 8 - Aging of receivables; estimating allowance for...Ch. 8 - Compare two methods of accounting for...Ch. 8 - Details of notes receivable and related entries...Ch. 8 - Notes receivable entries The following data relate...Ch. 8 - Sales and notes receivable transactions The...Ch. 8 - Allowance method entries The following...Ch. 8 - Aging of receivables; estimating allowance for...Ch. 8 - Compare two methods of accounting for...Ch. 8 - Details of notes receivable and related entries...Ch. 8 - Notes receivable entries The following data relate...Ch. 8 - Sales and notes receivable transactions The...Ch. 8 - Continuing Company AnalysisAmazon: Accounts...Ch. 8 - Ralph Lauren: Accounts receivable turnover and...Ch. 8 - L Brands: Accounts receivable turnover and number...Ch. 8 - Ralph Lauren and L Brands: Average accounts...Ch. 8 - Ethics In Action Bud Lighting Co. is a retailer of...Ch. 8 - Communication On January 1, Xtreme Co. began...

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