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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425
Textbook Problem
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For each of the following unbalanced reactions, suppose exactly 5.00 moles of each reactant are taken. Determine which reactant is limiting, and also determine what mass of the excess reagent will remain after the limiting reactant is consumed. For each reaction, solve the problem three ways:

l type='a'>

  • Set up and use Before—Change—After (BCA) tables.
  • i>Compare the moles of reactants to see which runs out first.

    i>Consider the amounts of products that can be formed by completely consuming each reactant.

    i>   CaC 2 ( s ) + H 2 O ( l ) Ca ( OH ) 2 ( s ) + C 2 H 2 ( g )

    i>   AgNO 3 ( a q ) + Al ( s ) Ag ( s ) + Al ( NO 3 ) 3 ( a q )

    (a) (1)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the balance reaction and set up and use Before-Change-After (BCA) tables.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of each product, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

    Explanation

    First, balance the reaction. From the balanced reaction, it can be determined that 1 mole of calcium carbide (CaC2(s)) reacts with 2 moles of water

    (a) (2)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the reactant that runs out first by comparing the number of moles of reactants.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of each product, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

    (a) (3)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the amount of each product that can be formed after the reaction comes to a completion.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of each product, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

    (b) (1)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the balance reaction and set up and use Before-Change-After (BCA) tables.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of each product, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

    (b) (2)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the reactant that runs out first by comparing the number of moles of reactants.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of eachproduct, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

    (b) (3)

    Interpretation Introduction

    Interpretation:

    Find the amount of each product that can be formed after the reaction comes to a completion.

    Concept Introduction:

    For the given unbalanced equations, the number of moles of each reactant is given. The equation needs to be balanced and the number of moles of the reactants needs to be compared to find the limiting reactant. The moles of the excess reactant that remains after the limiting reactant is completely consumed can then be determined from which the mass of the excess reactant can be calculated. Finally by comparing the moles of the limiting reactant with the number of moles of each product, the number of moles of the product formed after complete reaction can be determined and then the mass of each product can be calculated.

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