A Research Study On Mixed Methods

2163 WordsOct 10, 20149 Pages
Mixed methods Lately, researchers have begun to debate that qualitative and quantitative methods could play complementary functions as qualitative study could be used to formulate new questions and theories, which could then be tested through quantitative means, and reviewed later or extended through further qualitative investigation, and so on. A number of researchers discussed the mixed methods approach to investigation. According to Tashakkori and Teddlie (2003), it emerged in the mid to late 1900s and according to Cresswell (2009), by using a mixed methods approach to investigation, researchers integrate methods of gathering or studying data from the quantitative and qualitative research methods in a single research investigation.…show more content…
Recent opponents of this method to inquiry dispute that it basically serves the quantitative supporters, it pushes qualitative approach to secondary position, and it drifts too far from the interpretive foundation of qualitative inquiry (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005). This philosophy could come from the connotation these academics at times appear to establish between mixed methods study and the experimental orientation to educational study as discussed in the National Research Council (2002) and in the No Child Left Behind Act (2001) report on the reliability of scientific study in education. This judgement is a restricted or a limited, incorrect, and stereotypic perception regarding mixed methods inquiry. Evidently, the advantages and disadvantages associated with a number of research approaches or methods are not absolute, but in some way connected to the context and the method in which academics seek to address the phenomenon under investigation. For instance, if the researcher aims to provide in-depth understanding into a phenomenon, the researcher may consider selecting a small but instructive sample, which is a characteristic of qualitative investigation. The researcher might use inferential statistics to quantify the findings, which is distinctive of quantitative
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