University Physics with Modern Physics (14th Edition) - 14th Edition - by Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman - ISBN 9780321973610
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University Physics with Modern Physics ...
14th Edition
Hugh D. Young, Roger A. Freedman
Publisher: PEARSON
ISBN: 9780321973610

Solutions for University Physics with Modern Physics (14th Edition)

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Chapter 2.3 - Average And Instantaneous AccelerationChapter 2.4 - Motion With Constant AccelerationChapter 2.5 - Freely Falling BodiesChapter 3 - Motion In Two Or Three DimensionsChapter 3.1 - Position And Velocity VectorsChapter 3.2 - The Acceleration VectorChapter 3.3 - Projectile MotionChapter 3.4 - Motion In A CircleChapter 3.5 - Relative VelocityChapter 4 - Newton’s Laws Of MotionChapter 4.1 - Force And InteractionsChapter 4.2 - Newton’s First LawChapter 4.3 - Newton’s Second LawChapter 4.4 - Mass And WeightChapter 4.5 - Newton’s Third LawChapter 5 - Applying Newton’s LawsChapter 5.1 - Using Newton’s First Law: Particles In EquilibriumChapter 5.2 - Using Newton’s Second Law: Dynamics Of ParticlesChapter 5.3 - Friction ForcesChapter 5.4 - Dynamics Of Circular MotionChapter 6 - Work And Kinetic EnergyChapter 6.1 - WorkChapter 6.2 - Kinetic Energy And The Work–energy TheoremChapter 6.3 - Work And Energy With Varying ForcesChapter 6.4 - PowerChapter 7 - Potential Energy And Energy ConservationChapter 7.1 - Gravitational Potential EnergyChapter 7.2 - Elastic Potential EnergyChapter 7.3 - Conservative And Nonconservative ForcesChapter 7.4 - Force And Potential EnergyChapter 7.5 - Energy DiagramsChapter 8 - Momentum, Impulse, And CollisionsChapter 8.1 - Momentum And ImpulseChapter 8.2 - Conservation Of MomentumChapter 8.3 - Momentum Conservation And CollisionsChapter 8.4 - Elastic CollisionsChapter 8.5 - Center Of MassChapter 8.6 - Rocket PropulsionChapter 9 - Rotation Of Rigid BodiesChapter 9.1 - Angular Velocity And AccelerationChapter 9.2 - Rotation With Constant Angular AccelerationChapter 9.3 - Relating Linear And Angular KinematicsChapter 9.4 - Energy In Rotational MotionChapter 9.5 - Parallel-axis TheoremChapter 9.6 - Moment-of-inertia CalculationsChapter 10 - Dynamics Of Rotational MotionChapter 10.1 - TorqueChapter 10.2 - Torque And Angular Acceleration For A Rigid BodyChapter 10.3 - Rigid-body Rotation About A Moving AxisChapter 10.4 - Work And Power In Rotational MotionChapter 10.5 - Angular MomentumChapter 10.6 - Conservation Of Angular MomentumChapter 10.7 - Gyroscopes And PrecessionChapter 11 - Equilibrium And ElasticityChapter 11.1 - Conditions For EquilibriumChapter 11.2 - Center Of GravityChapter 11.3 - Solving Rigid-body Equilibrium ProblemsChapter 11.4 - Stress, Strain, And Elastic ModuliChapter 11.5 - Elasticity And PlasticityChapter 12 - Fluid MechanicsChapter 12.1 - Gases, Liquids, And DensityChapter 12.2 - Pressure In A FluidChapter 12.3 - BuoyancyChapter 12.4 - Fluid FlowChapter 12.5 - Bernoulli’s EquationChapter 12.6 - Viscosity And TurbulenceChapter 13 - GravitationChapter 13.1 - Newton’s Law Of GravitationChapter 13.2 - WeightChapter 13.3 - Gravitational Potential EnergyChapter 13.4 - The Motion Of SatellitesChapter 13.5 - Kepler’s Laws And The Motion Of PlanetsChapter 13.6 - Spherical Mass DistributionsChapter 13.7 - Apparent Weight And The Earth’s RotationChapter 13.8 - Black HolesChapter 14 - Periodic MotionChapter 14.1 - Describing OscillationChapter 14.2 - Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 14.3 - Energy In Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 14.4 - Applications Of Simple Harmonic MotionChapter 14.5 - The Simple PendulumChapter 14.6 - The Physical PendulumChapter 14.7 - Damped OscillationsChapter 14.8 - Forced Oscillations And ResonanceChapter 15 - Mechanical WavesChapter 15.1 - Types Of Mechanical WavesChapter 15.2 - Periodic WavesChapter 15.3 - Mathematical Description Of A WaveChapter 15.4 - Speed Of A Transverse WaveChapter 15.5 - Energy In Wave MotionChapter 15.6 - Wave Interference, Boundary Conditions, And SuperpositionChapter 15.7 - Standing Waves On A StringChapter 15.8 - Normal Modes Of A StringChapter 16 - Sound And HearingChapter 16.1 - Sound WavesChapter 16.2 - Speed Of Sound WavesChapter 16.3 - Sound IntensityChapter 16.4 - Standing Sound Waves And Normal ModesChapter 16.5 - Resonance And SoundChapter 16.6 - Interference Of WavesChapter 16.7 - BeatsChapter 16.8 - The Doppler EffectChapter 16.9 - Shock WavesChapter 17 - Temperature And HeatChapter 17.1 - Temperature And Thermal EquilibriumChapter 17.2 - Thermometers And Temperature ScalesChapter 17.3 - Gas Thermometers And The Kelvin ScaleChapter 17.4 - Thermal ExpansionChapter 17.5 - Quantity Of HeatChapter 17.6 - Calorimetry And Phase ChangesChapter 17.7 - Mechanisms Of Heat TransferChapter 18 - Thermal Properties Of MatterChapter 18.1 - Equations Of StateChapter 18.2 - Molecular Properties Of MatterChapter 18.3 - Kinetic-molecular Model Of An Ideal GasChapter 18.4 - Heat CapacitiesChapter 18.5 - Molecular SpeedsChapter 18.6 - Phases Of MatterChapter 19 - The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 19.1 - Thermodynamic SystemsChapter 19.2 - Work Done During Volume ChangesChapter 19.3 - Paths Between Thermodynamic StatesChapter 19.4 - Internal Energy And The First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 19.5 - Kinds Of Thermodynamic ProcessesChapter 19.6 - Internal Energy Of An Ideal GasChapter 19.7 - Heat Capacities Of An Ideal GasChapter 19.8 - Adiabatic Processes For An Ideal GasChapter 20 - The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 20.1 - Directions Of Thermodynamic ProcessesChapter 20.2 - Heat EnginesChapter 20.3 - Internal-combustion EnginesChapter 20.4 - RefrigeratorsChapter 20.5 - The Second Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 20.6 - The Carnot CycleChapter 20.7 - EntropyChapter 20.8 - Microscopic Interpretation Of EntropyChapter 21 - Electric Charge And Electric FieldChapter 21.1 - Electric ChargeChapter 21.2 - Conductors, Insulators, And Induced ChargesChapter 21.3 - Coulomb’s LawChapter 21.4 - Electric Field And Electric ForcesChapter 21.5 - Electric-field CalculationsChapter 21.6 - Electric Field LinesChapter 21.7 - Electric DipolesChapter 22 - Gauss’s LawChapter 22.1 - Charge And Electric FluxChapter 22.2 - Calculating Electric FluxChapter 22.3 - Gauss’s LawChapter 22.4 - Applications Of Gauss’s LawChapter 22.5 - Charges On ConductorsChapter 23 - Electric PotentialChapter 23.1 - Electric Potential EnergyChapter 23.2 - Electric PotentialChapter 23.3 - Calculating Electric PotentialChapter 23.4 - Equipotential SurfacesChapter 23.5 - Potential GradientChapter 24 - Capacitance And DielectricsChapter 24.1 - Capacitors And CapacitanceChapter 24.2 - Capacitors In Series And ParallelChapter 24.3 - Energy Storage In Capacitors And Electric-field EnergyChapter 24.4 - DielectricsChapter 24.5 - Molecular Model Of Induced ChargeChapter 24.6 - Gauss’s Law In DielectricsChapter 25 - Current, Resistance, And Electromotive ForceChapter 25.1 - CurrentChapter 25.2 - ResistivityChapter 25.3 - ResistanceChapter 25.4 - Electromotive Force And CircuitsChapter 25.5 - Energy And Power In Electric CircuitsChapter 25.6 - Theory Of Metallic ConductionChapter 26 - Direct-current CircuitsChapter 26.1 - Resistors In Series And ParallelChapter 26.2 - Kirchhoff’s RulesChapter 26.3 - Electrical Measuring InstrumentsChapter 26.4 - R-c CircuitsChapter 26.5 - Power Distribution SystemsChapter 27 - Magnetic Field And Magnetic ForcesChapter 27.1 - MagnetismChapter 27.2 - Magnetic FieldChapter 27.3 - Magnetic Field Lines And Magnetic FluxChapter 27.4 - Motion Of Charged Particles In A Magnetic FieldChapter 27.5 - Applications Of Motion Of Charged ParticlesChapter 27.6 - Magnetic Force On A Current-carrying ConductorChapter 27.7 - Force And Torque On A Current LoopChapter 27.8 - The Direct-current MotorChapter 27.9 - The Hall EffectChapter 28 - Sources Of Magnetic FieldChapter 28.1 - Magnetic Field Of A Moving ChargeChapter 28.2 - Magnetic Field Of A Current ElementChapter 28.3 - Magnetic Field Of A Straight Current-carrying ConductorChapter 28.4 - Force Between Parallel ConductorsChapter 28.5 - Magnetic Field Of A Circular Current LoopChapter 28.6 - Ampere’s LawChapter 28.7 - Applications Of Ampere’s LawChapter 28.8 - Magnetic MaterialsChapter 29 - Electromagnetic InductionChapter 29.2 - Faraday’s LawChapter 29.3 - Lenz’s LawChapter 29.4 - Motional Electromotive ForceChapter 29.5 - Induced Electric FieldsChapter 29.6 - Eddy CurrentsChapter 29.7 - Displacement Current And Maxwell’s EquationsChapter 30 - InductanceChapter 30.1 - Mutual InductanceChapter 30.2 - Self-inductance And InductorsChapter 30.3 - Magnetic-field EnergyChapter 30.4 - The R-l CircuitChapter 30.5 - The L-c CircuitChapter 30.6 - The L-r-c Series CircuitChapter 31 - Alternating CurrentChapter 31.1 - Phasors And Alternating CurrentsChapter 31.2 - Resistance And ReactanceChapter 31.3 - The L-r-c Series CircuitChapter 31.4 - Power In Alternating-current CircuitsChapter 31.5 - Resonance In Alternating-current CircuitsChapter 31.6 - TransformersChapter 32 - Electromagnetic WavesChapter 32.1 - Maxwell’s Equations And Electromagnetic WavesChapter 32.2 - Plane Electromagnetic Waves And The Speed Of LightChapter 32.3 - Sinusoidal Electromagnetic WavesChapter 32.4 - Energy And Momentum In Electromagnetic WavesChapter 32.5 - Standing Electromagnetic WavesChapter 33 - The Nature And Propagation Of LightChapter 33.1 - The Nature Of LightChapter 33.2 - Reflection And RefractionChapter 33.3 - Total Internal ReflectionChapter 33.5 - PolarizationChapter 33.7 - Huygens’s PrincipleChapter 34 - Geometric OpticsChapter 34.1 - Reflection And Refraction At A Plane SurfaceChapter 34.2 - Reflection At A Spherical SurfaceChapter 34.3 - Refraction At A Spherical SurfaceChapter 34.4 - Thin LensesChapter 34.5 - CamerasChapter 34.6 - The EyeChapter 34.7 - The MagnifierChapter 34.8 - Microscopes And TelescopesChapter 35 - InterferenceChapter 35.1 - Interference And Coherent SourcesChapter 35.2 - Two-source Interference Of LightChapter 35.3 - Intensity In Interference PatternsChapter 35.4 - Interference In Thin FilmsChapter 35.5 - The Michelson InterferometerChapter 36 - DiffractionChapter 36.1 - Fresnel And Fraunhofer DiffractionChapter 36.2 - Diffraction From A Single SlitChapter 36.3 - Intensity In The Single-slit PatternChapter 36.4 - Multiple SlitsChapter 36.5 - The Diffraction GratingChapter 36.6 - X-ray DiffractionChapter 36.7 - Circular Apertures And Resolving PowerChapter 37 - RelativityChapter 37.1 - Invariance Of Physical LawsChapter 37.2 - Relativity Of SimultaneityChapter 37.3 - Relativity Of Time IntervalsChapter 37.4 - Relativity Of LengthChapter 37.5 - The Lorentz TransformationsChapter 37.7 - Relativistic MomentumChapter 37.8 - Relativistic Work And EnergyChapter 38 - Photons: Light Waves Behaving As ParticlesChapter 38.1 - Light Absorbed As Photons: The Photoelectric EffectChapter 38.2 - Light Emitted As Photons: X-ray ProductionChapter 38.3 - Light Scattered As Photons: Compton Scattering And Pair ProductionChapter 38.4 - Wave–particle Duality, Probability, And UncertaintyChapter 39 - Particles Behaving As WavesChapter 39.2 - The Nuclear Atom And Atomic SpectraChapter 39.3 - Energy Levels And The Bohr Model Of The AtomChapter 39.4 - The LaserChapter 39.5 - Continuous SpectraChapter 39.6 - The Uncertainty Principle RevisitedChapter 40 - Quantum Mechanics I: Wave FunctionsChapter 40.1 - Wave Functions And The One-dimensional Schrödinger EquationChapter 40.2 - Particle In A BoxChapter 40.3 - Potential WellsChapter 40.4 - Potential Barriers And TunnelingChapter 40.5 - The Harmonic OscillatorChapter 40.6 - Measurement In Quantum MechanicsChapter 41 - Quantum Mechanics Ii: Atomic StructureChapter 41.1 - The Schrödinger Equation In Three DimensionsChapter 41.2 - Particle In A Three-dimensional BoxChapter 41.3 - The Hydrogen AtomChapter 41.4 - The Zeeman EffectChapter 41.5 - Electron SpinChapter 41.6 - Many-electron Atoms And The Exclusion PrincipleChapter 41.7 - X-ray SpectraChapter 41.8 - Quantum EntanglementChapter 42 - Molecules And Condensed MatterChapter 42.1 - Types Of Molecular BondsChapter 42.2 - Molecular SpectraChapter 42.3 - Structure Of SolidsChapter 42.4 - Energy BandsChapter 42.5 - Free-electron Model Of MetalsChapter 42.6 - SemiconductorsChapter 42.7 - Semiconductor DevicesChapter 43 - Nuclear PhysicsChapter 43.1 - Properties Of NucleiChapter 43.2 - Nuclear Binding And Nuclear StructureChapter 43.3 - Nuclear Stability And RadioactivityChapter 43.4 - Activities And Half-livesChapter 43.5 - Biological Effects Of RadiationChapter 43.6 - Nuclear ReactionsChapter 43.7 - Nuclear FissionChapter 43.8 - Nuclear FusionChapter 44 - Particle Physics And CosmologyChapter 44.1 - Fundamental Particles—a HistoryChapter 44.2 - Particle Accelerators And DetectorsChapter 44.3 - Particles And InteractionsChapter 44.4 - Quarks And GluonsChapter 44.5 - The Standard Model And BeyondChapter 44.6 - The Expanding UniverseChapter 44.7 - The Beginning Of Time

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Can a single force applied to a body change both its translational and rotational motions? Explain.Does a rigid object in uniform rotation about a fixed axis satisfy the first and second conditions...A cube of oak wood with very smooth faces normally floats in water. Suppose you submerge it...A student wrote: The only reason an apple falls downward to meet the earth instead of the earth...An object is moving with SHM of amplitude A on the end of a spring. If the amplitude is doubled,...Two waves travel on the same string. Is it possible for them to have (a) different frequencies; (b)...Section 1: To determine: The changes in the frequency of the sound when it travels from air into...Explain why it would not make sense to use a full-size glass thermometer to measure the temperature...Section 18.1 states that ordinarily, pressure, volume, and temperature cannot change individually...For the following processes, is the work done by the system (defined as the expanding or contracting...A pot is half-filled with water, and a lid is placed on it, forming a tight seal so that no water...If you peel two strips of transparent tape off the same roll and immediately let them hang near each...A rubber balloon has a single point charge in its interior. Does the electric flux through the...A student asked. Since electrical potential is always proportional to potential energy, why bother...Equation (24.2) shows that the capacitance of a parallel-plate capacitor becomes larger as the plate...The definition of resistivity ( = E/J) implies that an electric field exists inside a conductor. Yet...In which 120-V light bulb does the filament have greater resistance: a 60-W bulb or a 120-W bulb? If...Can a charged particle move through a magnetic field without experiencing any force? If so, how? It...A topic of current interest in physics research is the search (thus far unsuccessful) for an...A sheet of copper is placed between the poles of an electromagnet with the magnetic field...In an electric trolley or bus system, the vehicles motor draws current from an overhead wire by...Household electric power in most of western Europe is supplied at 240 V, rather than the 120 V that...By measuring the electric and magnetic fields at a point in space where there is an electromagnetic...Light requires about 8 minutes to travel from the sun to the earth. Is it delayed appreciably by the...A spherical mirror is cut in half horizontally. Will an image be formed by the bottom half of the...A two-slit interference experiment is set up, and the fringes are displayed on a screen. Then the...Why can we readily observe diffraction effects for sound waves and water waves, but not for light?...You are standing on a train platform watching a high-speed train pass by. A light inside one of the...The packages of electromagnetic energy are carried by particles called photons. Photons are...The de Broglie wavelength of any particle or any object is the ratio Plank’s constant and momentum....According to the wave particle duality, every material body is associated with a wave with...Probability of finding the particle is known as probability density of the particle. Write the...Van der Waals bonds occur in many molecules, but hydrogen bonds occur only with materials that...The predominant components in any living body are organic molecules and water. The major content of...The antiparticles bind with one another to form antimatter as exactly same as the ordinary particle...

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