Brock Biology of Microorganisms (15th Edition) - 15th Edition - by Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl - ISBN 9780134261928
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Brock Biology of Microorganisms (15th E...
15th Edition
Michael T. Madigan, Kelly S. Bender, Daniel H. Buckley, W. Matthew Sattley, David A. Stahl
Publisher: PEARSON
ISBN: 9780134261928

Solutions for Brock Biology of Microorganisms (15th Edition)

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Chapter 1.10 - Koch, Infectious Diseases, And Pure CulturesChapter 1.11 - Discovery Of Microbial DiversityChapter 1.12 - Molecular Basis Of LifeChapter 1.13 - Woese And The Tree Of LifeChapter 1.14 - An Introduction To Microbial LifeChapter 2 - Microbial Cell Structure And FunctionChapter 2.1 - Cell MorphologyChapter 2.2 - The Small WorldChapter 2.3 - The Cytoplasmic MembraneChapter 2.4 - Bacterial Cell Walls: PeptidoglycanChapter 2.5 - Lps: The Outer MembraneChapter 2.6 - Archaeal Cell WallsChapter 2.7 - Cell Surface StructuresChapter 2.8 - Cell InclusionsChapter 2.9 - Gas VesiclesChapter 2.10 - EndosporesChapter 2.11 - Flagella, Archaella, And Swimming MotilityChapter 2.12 - Gliding MotilityChapter 2.13 - Chemotaxis And Other TaxesChapter 2.14 - The Nucleus And Cell DivisionChapter 2.15 - Mitochondria, Hydrogenosomes, And ChloroplastsChapter 2.16 - Other Eukaryotic Cell StructuresChapter 3 - Microbial MetabolismChapter 3.1 - Feeding The Microbe: Cell NutritionChapter 3.2 - Transporting Nutrients Into The CellChapter 3.3 - Energy Classes Of MicroorganismsChapter 3.4 - Principles Of BioenergeticsChapter 3.5 - Catalysis And EnzymesChapter 3.6 - Electron Donors And AcceptorsChapter 3.7 - Energy-rich CompoundsChapter 3.8 - Glycolysis And FermentationChapter 3.9 - Respiration: Citric Acid And Glyoxylate CyclesChapter 3.10 - Respiration: Electron CarriersChapter 3.11 - Electron Transport And The Proton Motive ForceChapter 3.12 - Options For Energy ConservationChapter 3.13 - Sugars And PolysaccharidesChapter 3.14 - Amino Acids And NucleotidesChapter 3.15 - Fatty Acids And LipidsChapter 4 - Molecular Information Flow And Protein ProcessingChapter 4.1 - Dna And Genetic Information FlowChapter 4.2 - Genetic Elements: Chromosomes And PlasmidsChapter 4.3 - Templates, Enzymes, And The Replication ForkChapter 4.4 - Bidirectional Replication, The Replisome, And ProofreadingChapter 4.5 - Transcription In BacteriaChapter 4.6 - Transcription In Archaea And EukaryaChapter 4.7 - Amino Acids, Polypeptides, And ProteinsChapter 4.8 - Transfer RnaChapter 4.9 - Translation And The Genetic CodeChapter 4.10 - The Mechanism Of Protein SynthesisChapter 4.11 - Assisted Protein Folding And ChaperonesChapter 4.12 - Protein Secretion: The Sec And Tat SystemsChapter 4.13 - Protein Secretion: Gram-negative SystemsChapter 5 - Microbial Growth And Its ControlChapter 5.1 - Binary Fission, Budding, And BiofilmsChapter 5.2 - Quantitative Aspects Of Microbial GrowthChapter 5.3 - The Microbial Growth CycleChapter 5.4 - Continuous CultureChapter 5.5 - Growth Media And Laboratory CultureChapter 5.6 - Microscopic Counts Of Microbial Cell NumbersChapter 5.7 - Viable Counting Of Microbial Cell NumbersChapter 5.8 - Turbidimetric Measures Of Microbial Cell NumbersChapter 5.9 - Temperature Classes Of MicroorganismsChapter 5.10 - Microbial Life In The ColdChapter 5.11 - Microbial Life At High TemperaturesChapter 5.12 - Effects Of Ph On Microbial GrowthChapter 5.13 - Osmolarity And Microbial GrowthChapter 5.14 - Oxygen And Microbial GrowthChapter 5.15 - General Principles And Growth Control By HeatChapter 5.16 - Other Physical Control Methods: Radiation And FiltrationChapter 5.17 - Chemical Control Of Microbial GrowthChapter 6 - Microbial Regulatory SystemsChapter 6.1 - Dna-binding ProteinsChapter 6.2 - Negative Control: Repression And InductionChapter 6.3 - Positive Control: ActivationChapter 6.4 - Global Control And The Lac OperonChapter 6.5 - Transcription Controls In ArchaeaChapter 6.6 - Two-component Regulatory SystemsChapter 6.7 - Regulation Of ChemotaxisChapter 6.8 - Quorum SensingChapter 6.9 - Stringent ResponseChapter 6.10 - Other Global NetworksChapter 6.11 - Regulatory RnasChapter 6.12 - RiboswitchesChapter 6.13 - AttenuationChapter 6.14 - Feedback InhibitionChapter 6.15 - Post-translational RegulationChapter 7 - Molecular Biology Of Microbial GrowthChapter 7.1 - Visualizing Molecular GrowthChapter 7.2 - Chromosome Replication And SegregationChapter 7.3 - Cell Division And Fts ProteinsChapter 7.4 - Mreb And Cell MorphologyChapter 7.5 - Peptidoglycan BiosynthesisChapter 7.6 - Regulation Of Endospore FormationChapter 7.7 - Caulobacter DifferentiationChapter 7.8 - Heterocyst Formation In AnabaenaChapter 7.9 - Biofilm FormationChapter 7.10 - Antibiotic Targets And Antibiotic ResistanceChapter 7.11 - Persistence And DormancyChapter 8 - Viruses And Their ReplicationChapter 8.1 - What Is A Virus?Chapter 8.2 - Structure Of The VirionChapter 8.3 - Overview Of The Virus Life CycleChapter 8.4 - Culturing, Detecting, And Counting VirusesChapter 8.5 - Attachment And Entry Of Bacteriophage T4Chapter 8.6 - Replication Of Bacteriophage T4Chapter 8.7 - Temperate Bacteriophages And LysogenyChapter 8.8 - An Overview Of Animal Virus InfectionChapter 9 - Microbial Systems BiologyChapter 9.1 - Introduction To GenomicsChapter 9.2 - Sequencing And Annotating GenomesChapter 9.3 - Genome Size And Gene Content In Bacteria And ArchaeaChapter 9.4 - Organelle And Eukaryotic Microbial GenomesChapter 9.5 - Gene Families, Duplications, And DeletionsChapter 9.6 - Horizontal Gene Transfer And The MobilomeChapter 9.7 - Core Genome Versus Pan GenomeChapter 9.8 - MetagenomicsChapter 9.9 - Gene Chips And TranscriptomicsChapter 9.10 - Proteomics And The InteractomeChapter 9.11 - MetabolomicsChapter 9.12 - Single-cell GenomicsChapter 9.13 - Integrating Mycobacterium Tuberculosis OmicsChapter 9.14 - Systems Biology And Human HealthChapter 10 - Viral Genomics, Diversity, And EcologyChapter 10.1 - Size And Structure Of Viral GenomesChapter 10.2 - Viral EvolutionChapter 10.3 - Single-stranded Dna Bacteriophages: Φ3174 And M13Chapter 10.4 - Double-stranded Dna Bacteriophages: T7 And MuChapter 10.5 - Viruses Of ArchaeaChapter 10.6 - Uniquely Replicating Dna Animal VirusesChapter 10.7 - Dna Tumor VirusesChapter 10.8 - Positive-strand Rna VirusesChapter 10.9 - Negative-strand Rna Animal VirusesChapter 10.10 - Double-stranded Rna VirusesChapter 10.11 - Viruses That Use Reverse TranscriptaseChapter 10.12 - The Bacterial And Archael VirosphereChapter 10.13 - Viral Defense Mechanisms Of Bacteria And ArchaeaChapter 10.14 - The Human ViromeChapter 10.15 - ViroidsChapter 10.16 - PrionsChapter 11 - Genetics Of Bacteria And ArchaeaChapter 11.1 - Mutations And MutantsChapter 11.2 - Molecular Basis Of MutationChapter 11.3 - Reversions And Mutation RatesChapter 11.4 - MutagenesisChapter 11.5 - Genetic RecombinationChapter 11.6 - TransformationChapter 11.7 - TransductionChapter 11.8 - ConjugationChapter 11.9 - The Formation Of Hfr Strains And Chromosome MobilizationChapter 11.10 - Horizontal Gene Transfer In ArchaeaChapter 11.11 - Mobile Dna: Transposable ElementsChapter 11.12 - Preserving Genomic Integrity: Crispr InterferenceChapter 12 - Biotechnology And Synthetic BiologyChapter 12.1 - Manipulating Dna:pcr And Nucleic Acid HybridizationChapter 12.2 - Molecular CloningChapter 12.3 - Expressing Foreign Genes In BacteriaChapter 12.4 - Molecular Methods For MutagenesisChapter 12.5 - Reporter Genes And Gene FusionsChapter 12.6 - Somatotropin And Other Mammalian ProteinsChapter 12.7 - Transgenic Organisms In Agriculture And AquacultureChapter 12.8 - Engineered Vaccines And TherapeuticsChapter 12.9 - Mining Genomes And Engineering PathwaysChapter 12.10 - Engineering BiofuelsChapter 12.11 - From Synthetic Metabolic Pathways To Synthetic CellsChapter 12.12 - Genome Editing And CrisprsChapter 12.13 - Biocontainmnet Of Genetically Modified OrganismsChapter 13 - Metabolic Evolution And SystematicsChapter 13.1 - Formation And Early History Of EarthChapter 13.2 - Photosynthesis And The Oxidation Of EarthChapter 13.3 - Living Fossils: Dna Records The History Of LifeChapter 13.4 - Endosymbiotic Origin Of EukaryotesChapter 13.5 - The Evolutionary ProcessChapter 13.6 - The Evolution Of Microbial GenomesChapter 13.7 - Molecular Phylogeny:making Sense Of Molecular SequencesChapter 13.8 - The Species Concept In MicrobiologyChapter 13.9 - Taxonomic Methods In SystematicsChapter 13.10 - Classification And NomenclatureChapter 14 - Metabolic Diversity Of MicroorganismsChapter 14.1 - Photosynthesis And ChlorophyllsChapter 14.2 - Carotenoids And PhycobilinsChapter 14.3 - Anoxygenic PhotosynthesisChapter 14.4 - Oxygenic PhotosynthesisChapter 14.5 - Autotrophic PathwaysChapter 14.6 - Nitrogen FixationChapter 14.7 - Principles Of RespirationChapter 14.8 - Hydrogen (h2 ) OxidationChapter 14.9 - Oxidation Of Sulfur CompoundsChapter 14.10 - Iron (fe2+) OxidationChapter 14.11 - NitrificationChapter 14.12 - Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation (anammox)Chapter 14.13 - Nitrate Reduction And DenitrificationChapter 14.14 - Sulfate And Sulfur ReductionChapter 14.15 - Other Electron AcceptorsChapter 14.16 - AcetogenesisChapter 14.17 - MethanogenesisChapter 14.18 - MethanotrophyChapter 14.19 - Energetic And Redox ConsiderationsChapter 14.20 - Lactic And Mixed-acid FermentationsChapter 14.21 - Clostridial And Propionate FermentationsChapter 14.22 - Fermentations That Lack Substrate-level Phosphorylation 4Chapter 14.23 - SyntropyChapter 14.24 - Aerobic Hydrocarbon MetabolismChapter 14.25 - Anerobic Hydrocarbon MetabolismChapter 15 - Functional Diversity Of MicroorganismsChapter 15.1 - Making Sense Of Microbial DiversityChapter 15.2 - Overview Of Phototrophic BacteriaChapter 15.3 - CyanobacteriaChapter 15.4 - Purple Sulfur BacteriaChapter 15.5 - Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria And Aerobic Anoxygenic PhototrophsChapter 15.6 - Green Sulfur BacteriaChapter 15.7 - Green Nonsulfur BacteriaChapter 15.8 - Other Phototrophic BacteriaChapter 15.9 - Dissimilative Sulfate-reducersChapter 15.10 - Dissimilative Sulfur-reducersChapter 15.11 - Dissimilative Sulfur-oxidizersChapter 15.12 - Diversity Of Nitrogen-fixersChapter 15.13 - Diversity Of Nitrifiers And DenitrifiersChapter 15.14 - Dissimilative Iron-reducersChapter 15.15 - Dissimilative Iron-oxidizersChapter 15.16 - Methanotrophs And MethylotrophsChapter 15.17 - Microbial PredatorsChapter 15.18 - Microbial BioluminescenceChapter 15.19 - SpirochetesChapter 15.20 - Budding And Prosthecate/stalked MicroorganismsChapter 15.21 - Sheathed MicroorganismsChapter 15.22 - Magnetic MicrobesChapter 16 - Diversity Of BacteriaChapter 16.1 - AlphaproteobacteriaChapter 16.2 - BetaproteobacteriaChapter 16.3 - Gammaproteobacteria: EnterobacterialesChapter 16.4 - Gammaproteobacteria: Pseudomonadales And VibrionalesChapter 16.5 - Deltaproteobacteria And EpsilonproteobacteriaChapter 16.6 - Firmicutes: LactobacillalesChapter 16.7 - Firmicutes: Nonsporulating Bacillales And ClostridialesChapter 16.8 - Firmicutes: Sporulating Bacillales And ClostridialesChapter 16.9 - Tenericutes: The MycoplasmasChapter 16.10 - Actinobacteria: Coryneform And Propionic Acid BacteriaChapter 16.11 - Actinobacteria: MycobacteriumChapter 16.12 - Filamentous Actinobacteria: Streptomyces And RelativesChapter 16.13 - BacteroidalesChapter 16.14 - Cytophagales, Flavobacteriales, And SphingobacterialesChapter 16.15 - ChlamydiaeChapter 16.16 - PlanctomycetesChapter 16.17 - VerrucomicrobiaChapter 16.18 - Thermotogae And ThermodesulfobacteriaChapter 16.19 - AquificaeChapter 16.20 - Deinococcus–thermusChapter 16.21 - Other Notable Phyla Of BacteriaChapter 17 - Diversity Of ArchaeaChapter 17.1 - Extremely Halophilic ArchaeaChapter 17.2 - Methanogenic ArchaeaChapter 17.3 - ThermoplasmatalesChapter 17.4 - Thermococcales And ArchaeoglobalesChapter 17.5 - Thaumarchaeota And Nitrification In ArchaeaChapter 17.6 - Nanoarchaeota And The “hospitable Fireball”Chapter 17.7 - Korarchaeota And The “secret Filament”Chapter 17.8 - Habitats And Energy MetabolismChapter 17.9 - Crenarchaeota From Terrestrial Volcanic HabitatsChapter 17.10 - Crenarchaeota From Submarine Volcanic HabitatsChapter 17.11 - An Upper Temperature Limit For Microbial LifeChapter 17.12 - Molecular Adaptations To Life At High TemperatureChapter 17.13 - Hyperthermophilic Archaea, H2 , And Microbial EvolutionChapter 18 - Diversity Of Microbial EukaryaChapter 18.1 - Endosymbioses And The Eukaryotic CellChapter 18.2 - Phylogenetic Lineages Of EukaryaChapter 18.3 - ExcavataChapter 18.4 - AlveolataChapter 18.5 - StramenopilesChapter 18.6 - RhizariaChapter 18.7 - AmoebozoaChapter 18.8 - Fungal Physiology, Structure, And SymbiosesChapter 18.9 - Fungal Reproduction And PhylogenyChapter 18.10 - Microsporidia And ChytridiomycotaChapter 18.11 - Zygomycota And GlomeromycotaChapter 18.12 - AscomycotaChapter 18.13 - BasidiomycotaChapter 18.14 - Red AlgaeChapter 18.15 - Green AlgaeChapter 19 - Microbial Ecology And Environmental MicrobiologyChapter 19.1 - Enrichment Culture MicrobiologyChapter 19.2 - Classical Procedures For Isolating MicrobesChapter 19.3 - Selective Single-cell Isolation: Laser Tweezers, Flow Cytometry, Microfluidics, And High-throughput MethodsChapter 19.4 - General Staining MethodsChapter 19.5 - Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (fish)Chapter 19.6 - Pcr Methods Of Microbial Community AnalysisChapter 19.7 - Microaarays For Analysis Of Microbial Phylogenetic And Functional DiversityChapter 19.8 - Environmental Genomics And Related MethodsChapter 19.9 - Chemical Assays, Radioisotopic Methods, And MicrosensorsChapter 19.10 - Stable Isotopes And Stable Isotope ProbingChapter 19.11 - Linking Functions To Specific OrganismsChapter 19.12 - Linking Genes And Cellular Properties To Individual CellsChapter 20 - Microbial EcosystemsChapter 20.1 - General Ecological ConceptsChapter 20.2 - Ecosystem Service: Biogeochemistry And Nutrient CyclesChapter 20.3 - Environments And MicroenvironmentsChapter 20.4 - Surfaces And BiofilmsChapter 20.5 - Microbial MatsChapter 20.6 - SoilsChapter 20.7 - The Terrestrial SubsurfaceChapter 20.8 - FreshwatersChapter 20.9 - The Marine Environment: Phototrophs And Oxygen RelationshipsChapter 20.10 - Major Marine PhototrophsChapter 20.11 - Pelagic Bacteria, Archaea, And VirusesChapter 20.12 - The Deep SeaChapter 20.13 - Deep-sea SedimentsChapter 20.14 - Hydrothermal VentsChapter 21 - Nutrient CyclesChapter 21.1 - The Carbon CycleChapter 21.2 - Syntrophy And MethanogenesisChapter 21.3 - The Nitrogen CycleChapter 21.4 - The Sulfur CycleChapter 21.5 - The Iron And Manganese CyclesChapter 21.6 - The Phosphorus, Calcium, And Silica CyclesChapter 21.7 - Mercury TransformationsChapter 21.8 - Human Impacts On The Carbon And Nitrogen CyclesChapter 22 - Microbiology Of The Built EnvironmnetChapter 22.1 - Mining With MicroorganismsChapter 22.2 - Acid Mine DrainageChapter 22.3 - Bioremediation Of Uranium-contaminated EnvironmentsChapter 22.4 - Bioremediation Of Organic Pollutants: HydrocarbonsChapter 22.5 - Bioremediation Of Organic Pollutants: Pesticides And PlasticsChapter 22.6 - Primary And Secondary Wastewater TreatmentChapter 22.7 - Advanced Wastewater TreatmentChapter 22.8 - Drinking Water Purification And StabilizationChapter 22.9 - Water Distribution SystemsChapter 22.10 - The Microbiology Of Homes And Public SpacesChapter 22.11 - Microbially Influenced Corrosion Of MetalsChapter 22.12 - Biodeterioration Of Stone And ConcreteChapter 23 - Microbial Symbioses With Microbes, Plants, And AnimalsChapter 23.1 - LichensChapter 23.2 - “chlorochromatium Aggregatum”Chapter 23.3 - The Legume–root Nodule SymbiosisChapter 23.4 - MycorrhizaeChapter 23.5 - Agrobacterium And Crown Gall DiseaseChapter 23.6 - Heritable Symbionts Of InsectsChapter 23.7 - TermitesChapter 23.8 - Hawaiian Bobtail SquidChapter 23.9 - Marine Invertebrates At Hydrothermal Vents And Cold SeepsChapter 23.10 - Entomopathogenic NematodesChapter 23.11 - Reef-building CoralsChapter 23.12 - Alternative Mammalian Gut SystemsChapter 23.13 - The Rumen And Ruminant AnimalsChapter 24 - Microbial Symbioses With HumansChapter 24.1 - Overview Of The Human MicrobiomeChapter 24.2 - Gastrointestinal MicrobiotaChapter 24.3 - Oral Cavity And AirwaysChapter 24.4 - Urogenital Tracts And Their MicrobesChapter 24.5 - The Skin And Its MicrobesChapter 24.6 - Human Study Groups And Animal ModelsChapter 24.7 - Colonization, Succession, And Stability Of The Gut MicrobiotaChapter 24.8 - Disorders Attributed To The Gut MicrobiotaChapter 24.9 - Disorders Attributed To The Oral, Skin, And Vaginal MicrobiotaChapter 24.10 - Antibiotics And The Human MicrobiomeChapter 24.11 - Probiotics And PrebioticsChapter 25 - Microbial Infection And PathogenesisChapter 25.1 - Microbial AdherenceChapter 25.2 - Colonization And InvasionChapter 25.3 - Pathogenicity, Virulence, And AttenuationChapter 25.4 - Genetics Of Virulence And The Compromised HostChapter 25.5 - Enzymes As Virulence FactorsChapter 25.6 - Ab-type ExotoxinsChapter 25.7 - Cytolytic And Superantigen ExotoxinsChapter 25.8 - EndotoxinsChapter 26 - Innate Immunity:broadly Specific Host DefensesChapter 26.1 - Basic Properties Of The Immune SystemChapter 26.2 - Barriers To Pathogen InvasionChapter 26.3 - The Blood And Lymphatic SystemsChapter 26.4 - Leukocyte Production And DiversityChapter 26.5 - Pathogen Challenge And Phagocyte RecruitmentChapter 26.6 - Pathogen Recognition And Phagocyte Signal TransductionChapter 26.7 - Phagocytosis And Phagocyte InhibitionChapter 26.8 - Inflammation And FeverChapter 26.9 - The Complement SystemChapter 26.10 - Innate Defenses Against VirusesChapter 27 - Adaptive Immunity:highly Specific Host DefensesChapter 27.1 - Specificity, Memory, Selection Processes, And ToleranceChapter 27.2 - Immunogens And Classes Of ImmunityChapter 27.3 - Antibody Production And Structural DiversityChapter 27.4 - Antigen Binding And The Genetics Of Antibody DiversityChapter 27.5 - Mhc Proteins And Their FunctionsChapter 27.6 - Mhc Polymorphism, Polygeny, And Peptide BindingChapter 27.7 - T Cell Receptors: Proteins, Genes, And DiversityChapter 27.8 - T Cell DiversityChapter 27.9 - Allergy, Hypersensitivity, And AutoimmunityChapter 27.10 - Superantigens And ImmunodeficiencyChapter 28 - Clinical Microbiology And ImmunologyChapter 28.1 - Safety In The Microbiology LaboratoryChapter 28.2 - Healthcare-associated InfectionsChapter 28.3 - Workflow In The Clinical LaboratoryChapter 28.4 - Choosing The Right TreatmentChapter 28.5 - Immunoassays And DiseaseChapter 28.6 - Precipitation, Agglutination, And ImmunofluorescenceChapter 28.7 - Enzyme Immunoassays, Rapid Tests, And ImmunoblotsChapter 28.8 - Nucleic Acid–based Clinical AssaysChapter 28.9 - VaccinationChapter 28.10 - Antibacterial DrugsChapter 28.11 - Antimicrobial Drugs That Target Nonbacterial PathogensChapter 28.12 - Antimicrobial Drug Resistance And New Treatment StrategiesChapter 29 - EpidemiologyChapter 29.1 - The Language Of EpidemiologyChapter 29.2 - The Host CommunityChapter 29.3 - Infectious Disease Transmission And ReservoirsChapter 29.4 - Characteristics Of Disease EpidemicsChapter 29.5 - Public Health And Infectious DiseaseChapter 29.6 - Global Health ComparisonsChapter 29.7 - Emerging And Reemerging Infectious DiseasesChapter 29.8 - Examples Of Pandemics: Hiv/aids, Cholera, And InfluenzaChapter 29.9 - Public Health Threats From Microbial WeaponsChapter 30 - Person-to-person Bacterial And Viral DiseasesChapter 30.1 - Airborne PathogensChapter 30.2 - Streptococcal SyndromesChapter 30.3 - Diphtheria And PertussisChapter 30.4 - Tuberculosis And LeprosyChapter 30.5 - Meningitis And MeningococcemiaChapter 30.6 - Mmr And Varicella-zoster InfectionsChapter 30.7 - The Common ColdChapter 30.8 - InfluenzaChapter 30.9 - Staphylococcus Aureus InfectionsChapter 30.10 - Helicobacter Pylori And Gastric DiseasesChapter 30.11 - HepatitisChapter 30.12 - Ebola: A Deadly ThreatChapter 30.13 - Gonorrhea And SyphilisChapter 30.14 - Chlamydia, Herpes, And Human PapillomavirusChapter 30.15 - Hiv/aidsChapter 31 - Vectorborne And Soilborne Bacterial And Viral DiseasesChapter 31.1 - Rabies Virus And RabiesChapter 31.2 - Hantavirus And Hantavirus SyndromesChapter 31.3 - Rickettsial DiseasesChapter 31.4 - Lyme Disease And BorreliaChapter 31.5 - Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, Chikungunya, And ZikaChapter 31.6 - West Nile FeverChapter 31.7 - PlagueChapter 31.8 - AnthraxChapter 31.9 - Tetanus And Gas GangreneChapter 32 - Waterborne And Foodborne Bacterial And Viral DiseasesChapter 32.1 - Agents And Sources Of Waterborne DiseasesChapter 32.2 - Public Health And Water QualityChapter 32.3 - Vibrio Cholerae And CholeraChapter 32.4 - LegionellosisChapter 32.5 - Typhoid Fever And Norovirus IllnessChapter 32.6 - Food Spoilage And Food PreservationChapter 32.7 - Foodborne Disease And Food EpidemiologyChapter 32.8 - Staphylococcal Food PoisoningChapter 32.9 - Clostridial Food PoisoningChapter 32.10 - SalmonellosisChapter 32.11 - Pathogenic Escherichia ColiChapter 32.12 - CampylobacterChapter 32.13 - ListeriosisChapter 32.14 - Other Foodborne Infectious DiseasesChapter 33 - Eukaryotic Pathogens:fungi, Protozoa, And HelminthsChapter 33.1 - Pathogenic Fungi And Classes Of InfectionChapter 33.2 - Fungal Diseases: MycosesChapter 33.3 - Amoebae And Ciliates: Entamoeba, Naegleria, And BalantidiumChapter 33.4 - Other Visceral Parasites: Giardia, Trichomonas, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, And CyclosporaChapter 33.5 - Plasmodium And MalariaChapter 33.6 - Leishmaniasis, Trypanosomiasis, And Chagas DiseaseChapter 33.7 - Parasitic Helminths: Schistosomiasis And Filariases

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

We offer sample solutions for Brock Biology of Microorganisms (15th Edition) homework problems. See examples below:

The RNA of phage MS2 is folded in a complicated way, thereby, leading to formation of an extensive...Formation of a constitutive mutant: A constitutive mutant can be produced if the altered repressor...The expression vector is used for high level gene expression of cloned genes (for example,...The earth surface has changed over the period of time due to several factors. Huge flows of molten...In taxonomy, the Rhodobacter belongs to the genus of Rhodobacteraceae. It is used as a model...A key physiological feature that is present in all the given genus of bacteria that would...Enteric bacteria, for example species of Escherichia are facultative anaerobes. They inhabit the...In the figure, Archaea shows extensive phenotypic diversity. Archaea mainly constitutes of...Process of endosymbiosis can be viewed as an ancient and recent event. The origin and evolution of...An experiment to measure sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soil: Isolate Thiobacillus species...The release of very low levels of organic carbon, high levels of phosphate and ammonia from a sewage...Compare and contrast the carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles in terms of the physiologies of the...Acid mine drainage is in part a chemical process and in part a biological process. Discuss the...The digestive system of ruminants is completely different from those of humans. Before the...Normal microbiota of intestine performs a variety of useful function such as they help in digestion...Pictorial representation: The figure depicting the action of Coagulase and Streptokinase is...Innate immunity is a non-specific type of immunity and can be referred as the first line of defense...IgG is the most prevalent antibody found in the human blood serum. IgG is made up of “four...A procedure used to isolate and identify the new pathogen is done by direct observation and culture...The smallpox is an infectious disease that caused by two virus variants includes variola minor and...Cold is considered as a common respiratory illness due to its rapid onset. The causative agent of...The steps to be taken in case the child received a bite from the stray dog with no collar are...As a visitor of cholera endemic country, many types of safety measures can be practiced which are as...Several factors and procedures which have been proved very beneficial in the eradication of malaria...

More Editions of This Book

Corresponding editions of this textbook are also available below:

Brock Biology of Microorganisms (14th Edition)
14th Edition
ISBN: 9780321897398
Pearson eText for Brock Biology of Microorganisms -- Access Card (16th Edition)
16th Edition
ISBN: 9780135860625
Brock Biology Of Microorganisms (13th Edition)
13th Edition
ISBN: 9780321649638
Brock Biology of Microorganisms
16th Edition
ISBN: 9780134874401

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