Tutorials in Introductory Physics - 1st Edition - by Peter S. Shaffer, Lillian C. McDermott - ISBN 9780130970695
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Tutorials in Introductory Physics
1st Edition
Peter S. Shaffer, Lillian C. McDermott
Publisher: Addison Wesley
ISBN: 9780130970695

Solutions for Tutorials in Introductory Physics

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Chapter 3.3 - Conservation Of Momentum In One DimensionsChapter 3.4 - Conservation Of Momentum In Two DimensionsChapter 4.1 - Rotation MotionChapter 4.2 - Dynamics Of Rigid BodiesChapter 4.3 - Equilibrium Of Rigid BodiesChapter 5.1 - ChargeChapter 5.2 - Electric Field And FluxChapter 5.3 - Gauss' LawChapter 5.4 - Electric Potential DifferenceChapter 5.5 - CapacitanceChapter 6.1 - A Model For Circuits Part 1: Current And ResistanceChapter 6.2 - A Model For Circuits Part 2: Potential DiffernceChapter 6.3 - Rc CircuitsChapter 7.1 - Magnets And Magnetic FieldsChapter 7.2 - Magnetic InteractionsChapter 8.1 - Lenz' LawChapter 8.2 - Faraday's Law And ApplicationsChapter 9.1 - Superpositions And Reflection Of PulsesChapter 9.2 - Reflection And TransmissionChapter 9.3 - Propagation And Refraction Of Periodic WavesChapter 9.4 - Electromagnetic WavesChapter 10.1 - Light And ShadowChapter 10.2 - Plane MirrorsChapter 10.3 - Curved Mirrors And Multiple ReflectionsChapter 10.4 - Interpretation Of Ray DiagramsChapter 10.5 - Convex LensesChapter 10.6 - MagnificationChapter 11.1 - Two-sources InterfaceChapter 11.2 - Wave Properties Of LightChapter 11.3 - Multiple-slit InterfaceChapter 11.4 - A Model For Single-slit DiffractionChapter 11.5 - Combined Interference And DiffractionChapter 11.6 - Thin-film InterfaceChapter 11.7 - PolarizationChapter 12.1 - Pressure In A LiquidChapter 12.2 - BuoyancyChapter 13.1 - Ideal Gas LawChapter 13.2 - First Law Of ThermodynamicsChapter 14.1 - Wave Properties Of MatterChapter 14.2 - Photoelectric EffectChapter 15.1 - Velocity-homeworkChapter 15.2 - Representations Of Motion-homeworkChapter 15.3 - Acceleration In One Dimension-homeworkChapter 15.4 - Motion In Two Dimensions-homeworkChapter 15.5 - Relative Motion-homeworkChapter 16.1 - Forces-homeworkChapter 16.2 - Newton's Second And Third Law-homeworkChapter 16.3 - Tension-homeworkChapter 17.1 - Work And The Work-energy Theorem-homeworkChapter 17.2 - Changes In Energy And Momentum-homeworkChapter 17.3 - Conservation Of Momentum In One Dimensions-homeworkChapter 17.4 - Conservation Of Momentum In Two Dimensions-homeworkChapter 18.1 - Rotational Motion-homeworkChapter 18.2 - Dynamics Of Rigid Bodies-homeworkChapter 18.3 - Equilibrium Of Rigid Bodies-homeworkChapter 19.1 - Charge-homeworkChapter 19.2 - Electric Field And Flux-homeworkChapter 19.3 - Gauss' Law-homeworkChapter 19.4 - Electric Potential Difference-homeworkChapter 19.5 - Capacitance-homeworkChapter 20.1 - A Model For Circuits Part 1: Current And Resistance-homeworkChapter 20.2 - A Model For Circuits Part 2: Potential Differnce-homeworkChapter 20.3 - Rc Circuits-homeworkChapter 21.1 - Magnets And Magnetic Fields-homeworkChapter 21.2 - Magnetic Interactions-homeworkChapter 22.1 - Lenz' Law-homeworkChapter 22.2 - Faraday's Law And Applications-homeworkChapter 23.1 - Superpositions And Reflection Of Pulses-homeworkChapter 23.2 - Reflection And Transmission-homeworkChapter 23.3 - Propagation And Refraction Of Periodic Waves-homeworkChapter 23.4 - Electromagnetic Waves-homeworkChapter 24.1 - Light And Shadow-homeworkChapter 24.2 - Plane Mirrors-homeworkChapter 24.3 - Curved Mirrors And Multiple Reflections-homeworkChapter 24.4 - Interpretation Of Ray Diagrams-homeworkChapter 24.5 - Convex Lenses-homeworkChapter 24.6 - Magnification-homeworkChapter 25.1 - Two-sources Interface-homeworkChapter 25.2 - Wave Properties Of Light-homeworkChapter 25.3 - Multiple-slit Interface-homeworkChapter 25.4 - A Model For Single-slit Diffraction-homeworkChapter 25.5 - Combined Interference And Diffraction-homeworkChapter 25.6 - Thin-film Interface-homeworkChapter 25.7 - Polarization-homeworkChapter 26.1 - Pressure In A Liquid-homeworkChapter 26.2 - Buoyancy-homeworkChapter 27.1 - Ideal Gas Law-homeworkChapter 27.2 - First Law Of Thermodynamics-homeworkChapter 28.1 - Wave Properties Of Matter-homeworkChapter 28.2 - Photoelectric Effect-homework

Book Details

This landmark book presents a series of physics tutorials designed by a leading physics education research group. Emphasizing the development of concepts and scientific reasoning skills, the tutorials focus on common conceptual and reasoning difficulties. The tutorials cover a range of topics in Mechanics, E & M, and Waves & Optics.

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

We offer sample solutions for Tutorials in Introductory Physics homework problems. See examples below:

The diagram at right illustrates what an observer sees when looking at two boxes on a large table....Look at the room lights through one of the polarizing filters provided Describe how the filter...A cubical block is observed to float in a beaker of water. The block is then held near the center of...Recall the definition of work done on an object by an agent that exerts a force on that object. (You...How does the voltmeter reading compare to the potential difference across the electrodes? Explain....Reference frame of boat B: Complete the upper diagram at right by drawing and labeling boats A, B,...Draw an arrow to indicate the direction of the acceleration of hic block for each of the four...In the space provided, draw separate arrows representing the direction of the change in momentum...What does this observation imply about the net torque aboutthe pivot? Explain.The Surface area of the face of each plate is AI . Write an expression for the capacitance in terms...Describe the behavior of the bulb in the two situations below. i. The switch is first moved to...A magnet is hung by a string and then placed near a wire as shown. When the switch is closed, the...On the two diagrams below, indicate the direction of the induced current in the loop at each of the...A long, thin steel wire is cut in half, and each half is connected to a different terminal of a...Reproduced below is a side view diagram of the situation described in section II of the tutorial....Identical beams of light are incident on three different pairs of (ideal) polarizers. The double...1. Three objects are at rest in three beakers of water as shown. Compare the mass, volume, and...Introduction: The process with constant temperature and with some heat transfer is possible...

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