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College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300

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BuyFindarrow_forward

College Physics

11th Edition
Raymond A. Serway + 1 other
ISBN: 9781305952300
Textbook Problem

A thin 1.5-ram coating of glycerine has been placed between two microscope slides of width 1.0 cm and length 4.0 cm. Find the force required to pull one of the microscope slides at a constant speed of 0.30 m/s relative lo the oilier slide.

To determine
The force required to pull the block with a constant speed.

Explanation
The definition of the coefficient of viscosity is η=Fd/Av and this expression is rearranged for F=ηAv/d .

Given info: The viscosity of glycerine is 1500×103Ns/m2 , thickness of glycerine is 1.5mm , sides of the microscope slides are 1.0cm and 4.0cm , and the speed of the microscope slides is 0.30m/s .

The formula for the force required to pull the block with a constant speed is,

F=ηAvd

η is viscosity of glycerine.

A is area of the microscope slides.

v is speed of the microscope slides.

d is thickness of glycerine.

Substitute 1500×103Ns/m2 for η , 1.0cm×4

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