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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425
Textbook Problem
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ook at Fig. 14.2. Why doesn't temperature increase continuously ever time? That is, why does the temperature stay constanl for periods of time?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

Why temperature doesn’t increases continuously over time must be explained from figure 14.2.

Concept Introduction:

Physical state change is done by latent heat at constant temperature and pressure.

Explanation

Given information:

Heating cooling curve of water.

When a molecular solid is being heated then at a particular temperature the solid starts melting to a liquid state. This time there is no increase in temperature. The phase change required is supplied by latent heat of melting. This is around 80cal/g for ice. Intermolecular force gradually decreases and intermolecular distance increases

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