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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425
Textbook Problem
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The forces that connect two hydrogen atoms to an oxygen atom in a water molecule are (intermolecular/intramolecular). but the forces that hold water molecules close together in an ice cube arc (intermolecular/intramolecular).

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

Whether the forces which connect two hydrogen atoms to an oxygen atom in a water molecule are intramolecular or intermolecular should be explained and whether the forces which hold water molecules close together in an ice cube are intermolecular or intramolecular should be explained.

Concept Introduction:

Intermolecular forces are stronger. The forces which are present between two molecules is known as intermolecular forces whereas forces that are present within the molecule is known as intramolecular forces.

Explanation

As per shown in the above figure there is intermolecular force in ice in which many molecules (four) are involved...

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