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Chemistry

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl
ISBN: 9781133611097

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl
ISBN: 9781133611097
Textbook Problem

The equilibrium constant for a certain reaction increases by a factor of 6.67 when the temperature is increased from 300.0 K to 350.0 K. Calculate the standard change in enthalpy (∆H°) for this reaction (assuming ∆H° is temperature-independent).

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation: The standard enthalpy change of the reaction with the given values of increase in temperature and increase in equilibrium constant is to be calculated.

Concept Introduction: The relation between standard enthalpy change, temperature and equilibrium constant is determined by the formula,

ln(K2K1)=ΔHR(1T21T1)

To determine: The standard enthalpy change of the given reaction.

Explanation

Explanation

Given

The equilibrium constant of the reaction increases by 6.67 .

The initial temperature of the reaction is 300.0K .

The final temperature of the reaction is 350.0K .

The standard enthalpy change of the given reaction is calculated by using the formula,

ln(K2K1)=ΔHR(1T21T1)

Where,

  • K1 is the initial equilibrium constant of the reaction.
  • K2 is the final equilibrium constant of the reaction.
  • ΔH is the standard enthalpy change of the reaction

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