Biology: How Life Works - 3rd Edition - by James Morris, Daniel Hartl, Andrew Knoll, Melissa Michael, Robert Lue, Andrew Berry, Andrew Biewener, Brian Farrell, N. Michele Holbrook - ISBN 9781319017637
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Biology: How Life Works
3rd Edition
James Morris, Daniel Hartl, Andrew Knoll, Melissa Michael, Robert Lue, Andrew Berry, Andrew Biewener, Brian Farrell, N. Michele Holbrook
Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education
ISBN: 9781319017637

Solutions for Biology: How Life Works

Browse All Chapters of This Textbook

Chapter 2.5 - Organic MoleculesChapter 2.6 - Life's OriginsChapter 3.1 - Chemical Composition And Structure Of DnaChapter 3.2 - Dna Structure And FunctionChapter 3.3 - TranscriptionChapter 3.4 - Rna ProcessingChapter 4.1 - Molecular Structure Of ProteinsChapter 4.2 - Protein SynthesisChapter 4.3 - Protein Origins And EvolutionChapter 5.1 - Structure Of Cell MembranesChapter 5.2 - Movement In And Out Of CellsChapter 5.3 - Internal Organization Of CellsChapter 5.4 - The Endomembrane SystemChapter 5.5 - Mitochondria And ChloroplastsChapter 6.1 - An Overview Of MetabolismChapter 6.2 - Kinetic And Potential EnergyChapter 6.3 - Laws Of ThermodynamicsChapter 6.4 - Chemical ReactionsChapter 6.5 - Enzymes And The Rate Of Chemical ReactionsChapter 7.1 - An Overview Of Cellular RespirationChapter 7.2 - GlycolysisChapter 7.3 - Pyruvate OxidationChapter 7.4 - The Citric Acid CycleChapter 7.5 - The Electron Transport Chain And Oxidative PhosphorylationChapter 7.6 - Anaerobic MetabolismChapter 7.7 - Metabolic IntegrationChapter 8.1 - An Overview Of PhotosynthesisChapter 8.2 - The Calvin CycleChapter 8.3 - Capturing Sunlight Into Chemical FormsChapter 8.4 - Photosynthetic ChallengesChapter 8.5 - The Evolution Of PhotosynthesisChapter 9.1 - Principles Of Cell SignalingChapter 9.2 - Distance Between CellsChapter 9.3 - Signaling ReceptorsChapter 9.4 - G Protein-coupled ReceptorsChapter 9.5 - Receptor KinasesChapter 10.1 - Tissues And OrgansChapter 10.2 - The CytoskeletonChapter 10.3 - Cell JunctionsChapter 10.4 - The Extracellular MatrixChapter 11.1 - Cell DivisionChapter 11.2 - Mitotic Cell DivisionChapter 11.3 - Meiotic Cell DivisionChapter 11.4 - NondisjunctionChapter 11.5 - Cell Cycle RegulationChapter 11.6 - CancerChapter 12.1 - Dna ReplicationChapter 12.2 - Replication Of ChromosomesChapter 12.3 - Dna TechniquesChapter 12.4 - Genetic EngineeringChapter 13.1 - Genome SequencingChapter 13.2 - Genome AnnotationChapter 13.3 - Genes, Genomes, And Organismal ComplexityChapter 13.4 - Organization Of GenomesChapter 13.5 - Viruses And Viral GenomesChapter 14.1 - Genotype And PhenotypeChapter 14.2 - The Nature Of MutationsChapter 14.3 - Small-scale MutationsChapter 14.4 - Chromosomal MutationsChapter 14.5 - Dna Damage And RepairChapter 15.1 - Early Theories Of InheritanceChapter 15.2 - Foundations Of Modern Transmission GeneticsChapter 15.3 - SegregationChapter 15.4 - Independent AssortmentChapter 15.5 - Human GeneticsChapter 16.1 - The X And Y ChromosomesChapter 16.2 - Inheritance Of Genes In The X ChromosomeChapter 16.3 - Genetic LinkageChapter 16.4 - Inheritance Of Genes In The Y ChromosomeChapter 16.5 - Inheritance Of Mitochondrial And Chloroplast DnaChapter 17.1 - Heredity And EnvironmentChapter 17.2 - Resemblance Among RelativesChapter 17.3 - Twin StudiesChapter 17.4 - Complex Traits In Health And DiseaseChapter 18.1 - Chromatin To Messenger Rna In EukaryotesChapter 18.2 - Messenger Rna To Phenotype In EukaryotesChapter 18.3 - Transcriptional Regulation In ProkaryotesChapter 19.1 - Genetic Basis Of DevelopmentChapter 19.2 - Hierarchical ControlChapter 19.3 - Master RegulatorsChapter 19.4 - Combinatorial ControlChapter 19.5 - Cell Signaling In DevelopmentChapter 20.1 - Genetic VariationChapter 20.2 - Measuring Genetic VariationChapter 20.3 - Evolution And The Hardy-weinberg EquilibriumChapter 20.4 - Natural SelectionChapter 20.5 - Non-adaptive Mechanisms Of EvolutionChapter 20.6 - Molecular EvolutionChapter 21.1 - The Biological Species ConceptChapter 21.2 - Reproductive IsolationChapter 21.3 - SpeciationChapter 22.1 - Reading A Phylogenetic TreeChapter 22.2 - Building A Phylogenetic TreeChapter 22.3 - The Fossil RecordChapter 22.4 - Comparing Evolution's Two Great PatternsChapter 23.1 - The Great ApesChapter 23.2 - African OriginsChapter 23.3 - Human TraitsChapter 23.4 - Human Genetic VariationChapter 23.5 - Culture, Language, And ConsciousnessChapter 24.1 - Two Prokaryotic DomainsChapter 24.2 - An Expanded Carbon CycleChapter 24.3 - Sulfur And Nitrogen CyclesChapter 24.4 - Bacterial DiversityChapter 24.5 - Archaeal DiversityChapter 24.6 - The Evolutionary History Of ProkaryotesChapter 25.1 - A Review Of The Eukaryotic CellChapter 25.2 - Eukaryotic OriginsChapter 25.3 - Eukaryotic DiversityChapter 25.4 - The Fossil Record Of ProtistsChapter 26.1 - The Phylogenetic Distribution Of Multicellular OrganismsChapter 26.2 - Diffusion And Bulk FlowChapter 26.3 - How To Build A Multicellular OrganismChapter 26.4 - Plants Versus AnimalsChapter 26.5 - The Evolution Of Complex MulticellularityChapter 27.1 - Photosynthesis On LandChapter 27.2 - Carbon Dioxide Gain And Water LossChapter 27.3 - Water TransportChapter 27.4 - Transport Of CarbohydratesChapter 27.5 - Uptake Of Water And NutrientsChapter 28.1 - Alternation Of GenerationsChapter 28.2 - Seed PlantsChapter 28.3 - Flowering PlantsChapter 28.4 - Asexual ReproductionChapter 29.1 - Shoot Growth And DevelopmentChapter 29.2 - Plant HormonesChapter 29.3 - Secondary GrowthChapter 29.4 - Root Growth And DevelopmentChapter 29.5 - The Environmental Context Of Growth And DevelopmentChapter 29.6 - Timing Of Developmental EventsChapter 30.1 - Protection Against PathogensChapter 30.2 - Defense Against HerbivoresChapter 30.3 - Allocating Resources To DefenseChapter 30.4 - Defense And Plant DiversityChapter 31.1 - Major Themes In The Evolution Of Plant DiversityChapter 31.2 - BryophytesChapter 31.3 - Spore-dispersing Vascular PlantsChapter 31.4 - GymnospermsChapter 31.5 - AngiospermsChapter 32.1 - Growth And NutritionChapter 32.2 - ReproductionChapter 32.3 - DiversityChapter 33.1 - Animal Body PlansChapter 33.2 - Tissues And OrgansChapter 33.3 - HomeostasisChapter 33.4 - Evolutionary HistoryChapter 34.1 - Nervous System Function And EvolutionChapter 34.2 - Neuron StructureChapter 34.3 - Signal TransmissionChapter 34.4 - Nervous System OrganizationChapter 34.5 - Sensory SystemsChapter 34.6 - Brain Organization And FunctionChapter 35.1 - How Muscles WorkChapter 35.2 - Muscle Contractile PropertiesChapter 35.3 - Animal SkeletonsChapter 35.4 - Vertebrate SkeletonsChapter 36.1 - Endocrine FunctionChapter 36.2 - HormonesChapter 36.3 - The Vertebrate Endocrine SystemChapter 36.4 - Other Forms Of Chemical CommunicationChapter 37.1 - Delivery Of Oxygen And Elimination Of Carbon DioxideChapter 37.2 - Respiratory Gas ExchangeChapter 37.3 - Oxygen Transport By HemoglobinChapter 37.4 - Circulatory SystemsChapter 37.5 - Structure And Function Of The HeartChapter 38.1 - Patterns Of Animal MetabolismChapter 38.2 - Nutrition And DietChapter 38.3 - Adaptations For FeedingChapter 38.4 - Regional Specialization Of The GutChapter 39.1 - Water And Electrolyte BalanceChapter 39.2 - Excretion Of WastesChapter 39.3 - The Mammalian KidneyChapter 40.1 - The Evolutionary History Of ReproductionChapter 40.2 - Movement Onto Land And Reproductive AdaptationsChapter 40.3 - Human Reproductive Anatomy And PhysiologyChapter 40.4 - Gamete Formation To Birth In HumansChapter 41.1 - An Overview Of The Immune SystemChapter 41.2 - Innate ImmunityChapter 41.3 - B Cells And AntibodiesChapter 41.4 - T Cells And Cell-mediated ImmunityChapter 41.5 - Three PathogensChapter 42.1 - Sponges, Cnidarians, Ctenophores, And PlacozoansChapter 42.2 - Protostome AnimalsChapter 42.3 - ArthropodsChapter 42.4 - Deuterostome AnimalsChapter 42.5 - VertebratesChapter 43.1 - Tinbergen's QuestionsChapter 43.2 - Dissecting BehaviorChapter 43.3 - LearningChapter 43.4 - Information ProcessingChapter 43.5 - CommunicationChapter 43.6 - Social BehaviorChapter 44.1 - Populations And Their PropertiesChapter 44.2 - Population Growth And DeclineChapter 44.3 - Age-structured Population GrowthChapter 44.4 - Metapopulation DynamicsChapter 45.1 - The NicheChapter 45.2 - Antagonistic InteractionsChapter 45.3 - Mutualistic InteractionsChapter 45.4 - CommunitiesChapter 46.1 - The Short-term Carbon CycleChapter 46.2 - The Long-term Carbon CycleChapter 46.3 - Food Webs And Trophic PyramidsChapter 46.4 - Other Biogeochemical CyclesChapter 46.5 - The Ecological Framework Of BiodiversityChapter 47.1 - ClimateChapter 47.2 - BiomesChapter 47.3 - Global PatternsChapter 48.1 - The Anthropocene EpochChapter 48.2 - Human Influence On The Carbon CycleChapter 48.3 - Human Influence On The Nitrogen And Phosphorus CyclesChapter 48.4 - Human Influence On EvolutionChapter 48.5 - Conservation Biology

Sample Solutions for this Textbook

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The major function of the ECM is to provide structural support to the cell. In plants, ECM is seen...Oncogenes: Oncogenes can cause cancer. They may be mutated or highly expressed in a cell. They can...Pictorial representation: The restriction fragments produced by restriction enzymes can either have...Explanation: The steps necessary to synthesize mRNA from double stranded DNA are as follows: 1. The...The agents that have the potential to cause permanent changes in the genetic structure of an...Law of independent assortment states that: 1. Each pair of the factors assorts or segregates...Mitochondria generally demonstrate strictly maternal inheritance in both humans and other mammals....Explanation: Genes that are few with larger effects are easier to identify. When there is a larger...Explanation: When the large protein molecule binds with a small molecule of protein it leads to...Pictorial representation: Fig 1: Pathway of signal transduction. Fig 1: Pathway of signal...Explanation: To know when two species diverged, their nucleotide sequences or may be amino acids...Explanation: Genetic divergence is defined as process which occurs when two or more populations of...Phylogenies based on structural or molecular comparisons of living organisms create hypotheses about...Clothing and imaginatively constructed shelters are examples of the human capacity to transmit their...Earth is about 4.6 billion years of age. There are some sedimentary rocks that have survived in the...The eukaryotic cell or domain first appeared no later than 1800 million years ago and probably...In the atmosphere and surface of the oceans, the oxygen started to concentrate nearly about 2400...Explanation: The four adaptations of roots that enhance the uptake of nutrients from the soil are as...Explanation: In plants, asexual reproduction takes place by fragmentation, grafting, layering,...The photoperiodism ensures that the flowering takes place only when the size of plant is appropriate...Pictorial representation: Fig.1: The diversification of different species of the milkweed species....The wind-pollinated angiosperms usually have small flowers but have a large amount of pollen...Fungi have accumulated many evolutionary features over the course of time. The innovations that led...Cambrian explosion is the term that indicates a burst of animal diversity. During the Cambrian...Pictorial representation: Fig. 1: The four lobes of the brain. The four lobes of the brain are: (1)...Pictorial representation: Fig.1: The parts of the tibia bone. The outer layer of the bone is...Explanation: The difference between the action of a neurotransmitter, a hormone, a paracrine signal...Pictorial representation: Fig.1 - Path of blood flow in fish. Fig.2: The blood flow diagram in...The breakdown of food in invertebrates such as fishes, reptile, birds, and earthworms is carried out...Pictorial representation: Fig.1: A mammalian nephron. A mammalian nephron consists of three parts,...Pictorial representation: Fig 1: The spermatogenesis in male and oogenesis in female. The process of...Explanation: There are some ways in which a microorganism can evades from the attack of host’s...Pictorial representation: Fig 1: Phylogenetic relationship between birds, snakes and lizards. As...The natural selection operates on the individual level and not on the group level. So if an organism...Difference between Metapopulation and population: MetapopulationPopulationThe collection of...Explanation: The lemming has two species in the Bylot Island in the Canadian territory of Nunavut....Animals, plants as well as microbes obtain necessary compounds like carbon, energy, and organic...Nutrient limitation and climate play major roles in determining the primary productivity of...

More Editions of This Book

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Biology: How Life Works - Standalone book
2nd Edition
ISBN: 9781464126093
BIOLOGY: HOW LIFE WORKS (HC+LAUNCHPAD)
3rd Edition
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BIOLOGY: HOW LIFE WORKS (LL+LANCHPAD)
3rd Edition
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BIOLOGY: HOW LIFE WORKS (LL+ACHIEVE)
3rd Edition
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BIOLOGY: HOW LIFE WORKS(EBK+AHIEVE)
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781319230203
BIOLOGY HOW LIFE WORKS & ACHIEVE FOR BIO
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ISBN: 9781319406851
BIOLOGY: HOW LIFE WORKS (LOOSE-LEAF)
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781319449568
ACHIEVE FOR HOW LIFE WORKS 3E (4-TERM)
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781319508760
BIOLOGY:HOW...ACCESS-W/FLYER (48 MO.)
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781319358105
BIOLOGY:HOW LIFE WORKS (LL)-PACKAGE
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ISBN: 9781319369163
BIOLOGY:HOW LIFE WORKS (COMP.)-W/ACCESS
3rd Edition
ISBN: 9781319358075
Biology: How Life Works
1st Edition
ISBN: 9781319056919

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